Driving Theory Test – 5 Questions You May Not Know

When studying for a driving theory test, the Highway Code and other car driving books should be read. The theory apps can be complimented by using other driver training aids. Focusing on the test only, has limited learning value.

When studying for a driving theory test, most learner drivers use the available apps and Practice theory test for car drivers. Which is OK to get used to the technique required for the theory test itself. This method of learning the rules of driving is limiting your knowledge to what shows up on the app or sample test paper.

Why not just use the apps?

The apps available and sample test papers will not have all of the real questions that will turn up on the actual theory test for obvious reasons. Studying for your theory test using this method does not 100%prepare you for the practicalities of driving on the road. Neither does it prepare you for your driving test.

Your confidence in the driving of a car will greatly increase once you know more rules of the road, rather than focusing on a driving theory test. Lack of confidence comes from lack of practice and knowledge. As an example, would you attempt to play a game of football without first knowing the rules? So why then would you drive a car, which is a lot more dangerous than a playing a game of football?

Best way to gain extra knowledge

Driving Theory Test U turn sign
No U Turn Sign Post. Look at the black upside down U. The red circle and red diagonal line means you must NOT do whatever is shown in the red circle.

The best way to gain this extra knowledge for a driving theory test, would be to look at the latest edition of the Highway Code which you can do here. Additional to that you would need to find an DVSA Approved Driving Instructor (ADI) who can help you interpret some of the rules of driving you are not sure about. To demonstrate the point I was teaching doctor to drive who wanted to be dropped off at home instead of the hospital. I wasn’t familiar with the location, so I suggested that the pupil could drive themselves. So long as I was told which turn was going to be taken in advance.

After a while the pupil said they were going to turn right soon after passing this sign. Immediately after passing this sign the pupil signaled right and started to move into the section of road reserved for traffic to enter the road we were on. I said to the pupil. “What does that sign mean?” The reply came back. “No U turns.” I replied. “What does no U turns mean?”, “I don’t know.” Was the response. The pupil knew what the sign stood for, but not its actual meaning. This means the theory test would have been passed, but not a driving test.

Intensive Driving Lessons

Intensive driving lessons are they a good thing? This is a Money Supermarket website headline.
Below is a comment I wrote  on the moneysupermarket.com website.

Intensive courses the old fashioned way : First lesson on Monday test on Friday no longer work for most people. Engineers, siblings of a farmer would be the exception.
Intensive courses when used as part of an overall learning to drive programme can save a lot of money and time. Whilst producing a very safe driver at the end.
A 5 day intensive gets the process of car control into the nervous system with outstanding results. The following 5 days after a few days, or even a week off, the new driver blossoms out. The new driver is more than ready on this next 5 day course to take on traffic and challenging situations.
A test should never be booked whilst taking an intensive course. It blocks the learning process. Once things start to come together a test cancellation is then booked with extremely good results.

As you can see, I am firm believer that intensive driving courses, when used as part of an overall driver training programme are an excellent wayAre intensive driving lessons a good thing to save money and also save time. The really important added bonus though is the built in extra safety factor, over and above taking weekly lessons.

Are intensive driving lessons a good thing? Safety Observation

From a road safety viewpoint, intensive driving lessons produce a safer, more experienced driver. When a pupil makes a driving mistake. There is plenty of time to practice the correction. On weekly driving lessons it is usually left until next weeks lesson to try again. But this is often forgotten now by both instructor and pupil.

Repetition of good driving skills raises the standard of driving and produces a very safe and confident driver. 

West Midlands Casualty Reduction Scheme – Speed Cameras

Speed Awareness Course

The National Speed Awareness Course has been put in place to give drivers who are found to be in excess of the speed limit the opportunity to attend driver re-education on the effects and dangers of speeding as an alternative to a fixed penalty.

The course is only offered for low-level speeding offences detected by fixed or mobile speed cameras and drivers are only eligible if they have not attended a Speed Awareness Course anywhere in the country within the last three years. If you have been caught speeding, you will be notified if you are eligible to attend a Speed Awareness Course after completing the Notice of Intended Prosecution.

Since this is a national course, drivers can choose to take a course in any area that offers them, regardless of where the original offence occurred. Costs may vary between areas, but courses in the West Midlands currently cost £85 (subject to an annual review) and drivers who take the course will not receive three points on their licence.

The theory-based workshops last for four hours and cover:

Hazard awareness

Speeding consequences

Driving safety tips

For more information on courses within the West Midlands, to book a course, or to find directions to a course venue, please visit the TTC Group website. For information on courses in other areas, visit the National Association of Driver Intervention Providers website.

via West Midlands Casualty Reduction Scheme – Speed Cameras.